Stem cell Research

Stem cells are undifferentiated biological cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and can divide (through mitosis) to produce more stem cells.There are three known accessible sources of autologous adult stem cells in humans:

1.Bone marrow, which requires extraction by harvesting, that is, drilling into bone (typically the femur or iliac crest).

2.Adipose tissue (lipid cells), which requires extraction by liposuction.

3.Blood, which requires extraction through apheresis, wherein blood is drawn from the donor (similar to a blood donation), and passed through a machine that extracts the stem cells and returns other portions of the blood to the donor.

Stem cells can also be taken from umbilical cord blood just after birth. Stem cells have the remarkable potential to turn into many different cell types within the body throughout formative years and growth. Additionally, in several tissues they function as a sort of internal repair system, dividing basically without any limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal continues to be alive. Once a stem cell divides, each newly developed cell has the potential to stay as a stem cell or become another variety of cell with a more specialised function, like a muscle cell, a red blood corpuscle, or a nerve cell. Stem-cell therapy is the use of stem cells to treat or cure a disease or condition. Bone marrow transplant is the most commonly used stem-cell therapy, however some therapies derived from umbilical cord blood also are in use. A stem cell transplant is a treatment for many forms of cancer. For instance, you might have one if you have leukaemia, myeloma, or some types of lymphoma. Doctors conjointly treat some blood diseases with stem cell transplants.

    Related Conference of Stem cell Research

    May 08-09, 2017

    7th World Hematologists Congress

    Barcelona, Spain

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